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Monday, August 24, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Psalm 116:16 Personal Service (0312)

Personal Service 

A Sermon (0312)
Delivered on Thursday Evening, May 3rd, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Surrey Chapel, Blackfriar's Road
on behalf of the Religious Tract Society.

O Lord, truly I am thy servant; I am thy servant and the son of thine handmaid thou hast loosed my bonds. - Psalm 116:16

These sentences suggest a contrast. David's religion was one of perfect liberty;—"Thou hast loosed my bonds." It was one of complete service;—"Truly l am thy servant. I am thy servant and the son of thine handmaid." Did I say the text suggested a contrast? Indeed the two things need never be contrasted, for they are found to be but part of one divine experience in the Jives of all God's people. The religion of Jesus is the religion of liberty. The true believer can say, when his soul is in a healthy state, "Thou hast loosed my bonds. The penal fetters with which my soul was once bound are all dashed to shivers; I am free!" "There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit." The burdensome bonds of ceremonials




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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Job 8:7 The Beginning Increase And End Of The Divine Life (0311)

The Beginning Increase And End Of The Divine Life

A Sermon (0311)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, April 29th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Though thy beginning was small, yet thy latter end should greatly increase. - Job 8:7

This was the reasoning of Bildad the Shuhite. He wished to prove that Job could not possibly be an upright man, for if he were so, he here affirms that his prosperity would increase continually, or that if he fell into any trouble, God would awake for him, and make the habitation of his righteousness prosperous; and though his family were now all destroyed, and his wealth scattered to the winds, yet if he were an upright man, God would surely appear for him, and his latter end would greatly increase.




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Monday, August 10, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon 2 Corinthians 5:21 Christ Our Substitute (0310)

Christ Our Substitute

A Sermon (0310)
Delivered on Sabbath Evening, April 15th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at New Park Street, Southwark.

For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him. - 2 Corinthians 5:21

Sometime ago an excellent lady sought an interview with me, with the object as she said, of enlisting my sympathy upon the question of "Anti-Capital Punishment." I heard the excellent reasons she urged against hanging men who had committed murder, and though they did not convince me, I did not seek to answer them. She proposed that when a man committed murder, he should be confined for life. My remark was, that a great many men who had been confined half their lives were not a bit the better for it, and as for her belief that they would necessarily be brought to repentance, I was afraid it was but a dream. "Ah," she said, good soul as she was, "that is because we have been all wrong about punishments. We punish people because we think they deserve to be punished.




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Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Exodus 10:26 Full Redemption (0309)

Full Redemption

A Sermon (0309)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, April 22nd, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

There shall not a hoof be left behind. - Exodus 10:26

The controversy between Jehovah, the God of the whole earth, and Pharaoh, king of Egypt, was intended to be remembered, and spoken of throughout all generations. On that occasion, God permitted human nature to arrive at its highest degree of stubbornness and obstinacy; but he, nevertheless, cowed it, and overcame it. He did indeed raise up Pharaoh for this purpose, that he might show forth his power in him. Pharaoh, as an absolute monarch, is permitted to go to the utmost degree of hardness of heart, and yet the Lord would show to all coming generations that his decrees
shall stand, and he will do all his pleasure. You will remember that the quarrel was on this wise - God had sent his people into Egypt in the olden times, there to dwell in the land of Goshen. They had multiplied exceedingly, they had been favourably treated by succeeding kings, till at length a new king arose who knew not Joseph. He began to oppress the people, but the more he oppressed hem, the more they increased. He made their lives bitter with hard bondage. In mortar and in rick, and ina ll manner of service of the field, did he make hem to serve with rigour. Probably they were employed in building many of those mighty piles, the pyramids



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Monday, July 27, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Luke 8:4-8 The Parable Of The Sower (0308)

The Parable Of The Sower

A Sermon (0308)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, April 15th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

And when much people were gathered together, and were come to him out of every city, he spake by a parable: a sower went out to sow his seed: and as he sowed, some fell by the way side; and it was trodden down, and the fowls of the air devoured it. And some fell upon a rock; and as soon as it was sprung up, it withered away, because it lacked moisture. And some fell among thorns; and the thorns sprang up with it, and choked it. And other fell on good ground, and sprang up, and bare fruit an hundredfold. And when he had said these things, he cried, He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.” — Luke 8:4-8

IN OUR country, when a sower goes forth to his work, he generally enters into an enclosed field, and scatters the seed from his basket along every ridge and furrow; but in the East, the corn-growing country, hard by a small town, is usually an open area. It is divided into different properties, but there are no visible divisions, except the ancient landmarks, or perhaps ridges of stones. Through these open lands there are footpaths, the most frequented being called the highways. You must not imagine these highways to be like our macadamized roads; they are merely paths, trodden tolerably hard. Here and there you notice bye-ways, along which travelers who wish to avoid the public road may journey with a little more safety when the main road is infested with robbers: hasty travelers also strike out short cuts for themselves, and so open fresh tracks for others. When the sower goes forth to sow he finds a plot of round scratched over with the primitive Eastern plough; he aims at scattering his seed there most plentifully; but a path runs through the center of his field.. ...




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Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon 1 Chronicles 15:13 Importance Of Small Things In Religion (0307)

Importance Of Small Things In Religion

A Sermon (0307)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, April 8th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

The Lord our God made a breach upon us for that we sought him not after the due order. - 1 Chronicles 15:13

Let me explain the events of which a summary is to be found in 2 Samuel 6., and 1 Chronicles 13:and 15:The ark of the covenant was a kind of chest made of shittim wood, and lined within and without with gold. Within this ark were preserved the tables of stone, which were received from heaven by Moses when he was upon the mount. There also lay the golden pot that had the manna, and Aaron's rod that budded. Upon the lid of it were represented cherubic figures of angels; and between the wings of the cherubim, when the ark was at rest, there was seen that miraculously bright light, called the Shekinah, which was the token of the presence of the Most High God. The lid of the ark, as you will remember was called the mercy-seat. The whole ark was one of the most sacred things in the symbolic worship of the Jews because if they understood aright, it was to them the expression of God's dwelling with them, for where that ark was, God specially rested. Its lid being called the mercy seat, was the representation of Jesus Christ who is our ark - the ark of the covenant in which God dwelt among men, and he is our mercy-seat by whom we have access to our Father, God. You will remember that after this ark was made... ...




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Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon 1 Corinthians 15:35-38 Resurgam (0306)

Resurgam

A Sermon (0306)
Delivered on Sabbath Evening, April 1st, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand

But some man will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come; Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die: and that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be but bare grain, it may chance of wheat or of some other grain but God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. - 1 Corinthians 15:35-38

We preach with words; God preacheth to us in acts and deeds. If we would but perceive it, creation and providence are two continual sermons, streaming from the mouth of God. The seasons are four evangelists, each of them having his testimony to utter to us. Doth not summer preach to us of God's bounty, of the richness of his goodness, of that lavish munificence with which he has been pleased to supply the earth, not simply with food for man, but with delights for both ear and eye in the beauteous landscape the melodious birds, and the flowers of various hue? Have you never heard the still small voice of autumn, who bears the wheatsheaf, and whispers to us in the rustling of the seer leaf? He bids us prepare to die. "All we," saith he, "do fade as a leaf, and all our righteousnesses are but as filthy rags.... ...




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Friday, July 10, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Exodus 11:7 Separating The Precious From The Vile (0305)


Separating The Precious From The Vile

A Sermon (0305)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, March 25th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

That ye may know how that the Lord hath put a difference between the Egyptians and Israel - Exodus 11:7

The difference between the Egyptians and Israel was exceedingly manifest. At first sight it seemed to be very greatly to the advantage of Egypt. They had the whip in their hand, and poor Israel smarted under the lash. Egypt possessed the toil of the Israelites. the sons of Jacob made bricks, and the subjects of Pharaoh inhabited the houses which the sons of Jacob builded. How soon, however, were the tables turned! God wrought plagues in Egypt. but Goshen was spared. He sent a thick darkness over all the land, even darkness that might be felt; but in all the land of Goshen there was light. He sent all manner of flies and lice in all their borders, but throughout the habitations of Israel not a fly was to be seen, neither were they molested by the living things which crept upward from the quickened dust of the earth. The Lord sent hail and a murrain upon all the cattle of the Egyptians; but the cattle of the children of Israel were spared, and on their fields fell no desolating shower from heaven. At last the destroying angel unsheathed his glittering sword to smite his last decisive blow. In every house throughout the land of Egypt there was weeping and wailing, he smote the firstborn of Egypt, the chief of all their strength.. ...



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Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Deuteronomy 32:29 Memento Mori (0304)

Memento Mori

A Sermon (0304)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, March 18th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Oh that they were wise, that they understood this, that they would consider their latter end." - Deuteronomy 32:29

Man in unwilling to consider the subject of death. The shroud, the mattock and the grave, he labors to keep continually out of sight. He would live here always if he could; and since he cannot, he at least will put away every emblem of death as far as possible from his sight. Perhaps there is no subject so important, which is so little thought of. Our common proverb that we use is just the expression of our thoughts, "We must live." But if we were wiser we should alter it and say, "We must die." Necessity for life there is not; lift is a prolonged miracle. Necessity for death there certainly is, it is the end of all things. Oh that the living would lay it to heart. Some years ago, a celebrated author - Drelincourt, wrote a work on Death, a valuable work in itself, but it commanded no sale whatever. There were no men who would trouble themselves with Death's heads and cross-bones. And to show how foolish man is, a certain doctor went home and wrote a silly ghost-story, not one word of which was true, sent it to the bookseller, he stitched it up with his volume, and the whole edition sold.... ...




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Friday, July 3, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Deuteronomy 10:14-16 Election And Holiness (0303)

Election And Holiness

A Sermon (0303)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, March 11th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Behold, the heaven and the heaven of heavens is the Lord's thy God, the earth also, with all that therein is. Only the Lord had a delight in thy fathers to love them, and he chose their seed after them, even you above all people, as it is this day. Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked. - Deuteronomy 10:14-16

He who preaches the whole truth as it is in Jesus will labor under continual disadvantages; albeit, that the grand advantage of having the presence and blessing of God will more than compensate the greatest loss. It has been my earnest endeavor ever since I have preached the Word, never to keep back a single doctrine which I believe to be taught of God. It is time that we had done with the old and rusty systems that have so long curbed the freeness of religious speech. The Arminian trembles to go an inch beyond Arminius or Wesley, and many a Calvinist refers to John Gill or John Calvin, as any ultimate authority. It is time that the systems were broken up, and that there was sufficient grace in all our hearts to believe everything taught in God's Word, whether it was taught by either of these men or not.... ...




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Monday, June 29, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon John 4:34 Jesus About His Father's Business (0302)

Jesus About His Father's Business

A Sermon (0302)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, March 4th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Jesus saith unto them, my meat is to do the will of him that sent me, and to finish his work. - John 4:34

It is peculiarly pleasing to the Christian to observe the interest which God the Father takes in the work of salvation. In our earlier days of childhood in grace, we conceived the idea that God the Father was only made propitious to us through the atonement of Christ that Jesus was the Savior, and that the Father was rather an austere Judge than a tender friend. But since then, we have learned the Father through the Son: for it was not possible we could come unto the Father except through Jesus Christ. But, now, having seen Christ, we have seen the Father also, and from henceforth, we both know the Father, and have seen him, since we know the love of Christ, and have felt it shed abroad in our hearts. It is always refreshing then, to the enlightened Christian, to call to mind the intense interest which the Father takes in the work of salvation. Here you find in this verse it is three times hinted at. Salvation-work is called the Father's will.... ...




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Friday, June 26, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Jeremiah 6:14 A Blast Of The Trumpet Against False Peace (0301)

A Blast Of The Trumpet Against False Peace

A Sermon (0301)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, February 26th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Peace, peace, when there is no peace. - Jeremiah 6:14

Ministers are fearfully guilty if they intentionally build up men in a false peace. I cannot imagine any man more greatly guilty of blood than he who plays jackal to the lion of hell, by pandering to the depraved tastes of vain, rebellious man. The physician who should pamper a man in his disease, who should feed his cancer, or inject continual poison into the system, while at the same time he promised sound health and long life such a physician would not be one half so hideous a monster of cruelty as the professed minister of Christ who should bid his people take comfort, when, instead thereof, he ought to be crying, "Woe unto them that are at ease in Zion: be troubled, ye careless ones." The work of the ministry is no child's play; it is a labor which might fill an angel's hands—did fill the Savior's heart.




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Monday, June 22, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon John 14:27 Spiritual Peace (0300)

Spiritual Peace

A Sermon (0300)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, February 19th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you. - John 14:27

Our Lord was now about to die, to depart from this world, and to ascend to his Father; he therefore makes his will; and this is the blessed legacy which he leaves to the faithful - "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you."

We may rest well assured that this testament of our Lord Jesus Christ is valid. You have here his own signature; it is signed, sealed, and delivered in the presence of the eleven apostles, who are faithful and true witnesses. 'Tis true a testament is not in force while the testator liveth, but Jesus Christ has died once for all; and now none can dispute his legacy. The will is in force, because the testator has died. It may however, sometimes happen that a testator's wishes in a will may be disregarded, and
he, powerless beneath the sod, is quite unable to rise and demand that his last will should be carried out. But our Lord Jesus Christ who died, and therefore made his will valid rose again, and now he lives to see every stipulation of it carried out; and this blessed codicil, "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you," is sure to all the blood-bought seed. Peace is theirs, and must be theirs, because he died and put the will in force, and lives to see the will fulfilled.



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Friday, June 19, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Psalm 19:12 Sin Immeasurable (0299)

Sin Immeasurable

A Sermon (0299)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, February 12th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Who can understand his errors? - Psalm 19:12

What we know is as nothing when compared with what we know not. The sea of wisdom has cast up a shell or two upon our shore, but its vast depths have never known the footstep of the searcher. Even in natural things we know but the surface of matters. He that has traveled the wide world over, and has descended into its deepest mines, must yet be aware that he has viewed but a part of the mere crust of this world; that as for its vast center, its mysterious fires and molten secrete, the mind of man hath not as yet conceived them. If you will turn your eyes above, the astronomer will tell you that the undiscovered stars, that the vast mass of worlds which form the milky way, and the abundant masses of nebulae - that those vast clusters of unknown worlds, as infinitely exceed the little that we can explore, as a mountain exceeds a grain of sand. All the knowledge which the wisest men can possibly attain in a whole life-time, is no more than what the child may take up from the sea with his tiny cup, compared with the boundless waters which fill their channels to the brim.



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Monday, June 15, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon 2 Kings 5:12 Mr Evil-Questioning Tried And Executed (0297)

Mr Evil-Questioning Tried And Executed

A Sermon (0297)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, February 5th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? may I not wash in them, and be clean? - 2 Kings 5:12

Proud self and evil questioning are two of Satan's firmest allies, and two of the chief destroyers of the souls of men. Both of these adversaries attacked Naaman at once. Proud Self fell upon him and gave him the first blow, and Naaman cried, Behold, I thought, He will surely come out to me, and stand and call on the name of the Lord his God, and strike his hand over the place and recover the leper." When Proud Self had given his blow, on came his friend and helper, Evil Questioning, and he smote Naaman, and then Naaman said, "Are not Abana and Pharpar, rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? may I not wash in them, and be clean?" Ah! it is a hard case with a man who has to fight with two such imps as these - his own proud spirit, and that equally wicked spirit of unbelief - asking questions - evil questions - and tempting the Lord our God. Against the first, namely, our proud and righteous self, God has opened all his batteries. The ten commands are like ten great pieces of ordnance, every one of them pointed against our own pride and... ...




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Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Amos 9:13 A Revival Sermon (0296)

A Revival Sermon

A Sermon (0296)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, January 26th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, that the plowman shall overtake the reaper, and the treader of grapes him that soweth seed; and the mountains shall drop sweet wine, and all the hills shall melt. -

God's promises are not exhausted when they are fulfilled, for when once performed they stand just as good as they did before, and we may await a second accomplishment of them. Man's promises even at the best, are like a cistern which holds but a temporary supply; but God's promises are as a fountain, never emptied, ever overflowing, so that you may draw from hem the whole of that which the apparently contain, and they shall be still as full as ever. Hence it is that you will frequently find a promise containing both a literal and spiritual meaning. In the literal meaning it has already been fulfilled to the letter; in the spiritual meaning it shall also be accomplished, and not a jot or tittle of it shall fail. This is rue of the particular promise which is before us. Originally, as you are aware, the land of Canaan was very fertile; it was a land that flowed with milk and honey. Even where no tillage had been exercised upon it the land was so fruitful, that the bees who sucked the sweetness from the wild flowers produced such masses of honey that the very woods were sometimes flooded with it....




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Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Ephesians 1:7 The Treasure of Grace (0295)

The Treasure of Grace

A Sermon (0295)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, January 22nd, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

The forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace. - Ephesians 1:7

As is Iasiah among the prophets, so is Paul among the apostles; each stands forth with singular prominence, raised up by God for a conspicuous purpose, and shining as a star of extraordinary brilliance. Isaiah spake more of Christ, and described more minutely his passion and his death than all the other prophets put together. Paul proclaimed the grace of God - free, full, sovereign, eternal race - beyond all the glorious company of the apostles. Sometimes he soared to such amazing heights, or dived into such unsearchable depths, that even Peter could not follow him. He was ready to confess that "our beloved brother Paul, according to his wisdom given unto him," had written "some things hard to be understood." Jude could write of the judgments of God, and reprove with terrible words, "ungodly men, who turned the grace of God into lasciviousness." But he could not tell out the purpose of grace as it was planned in the eternal mind, or the experience




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Friday, May 29, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon 2 Chronicles 28:10 A Home Question (0294)

A Home Question

A Sermon (0294)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, January 15th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

But are there not with you, even with you, sins against the Lord your God? - 2 Chronicles 28:10

This was a home stroke. When the children of Israel had bloodthirsty thoughts towards their brethren of Judah, the prophet very earnestly dissuaded them. "Why deal ye so sternly with your brethren who are in your power, simply because they have sinned. Smite them not too furiously, for are there not with you, even with you, sins against the Lord your God?" How remarkably pertinent is such a question to different nations, to different sects, to different classes among men. We are too apt to look upon the sins of other nations and forget our own. Placed as we imagine ourselves to be in a pre-eminence in the midst of the peoples of the earth - we are continually criticising the acts of other tribes and nations. We look across the flood and we see that grand Republic, with the black stain of slavery upon its fair hand, and we cry out against it with all our might. We look across the channel, and we see a nation that we are continually charging.. ...




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Monday, May 25, 2015

Spurgeon's Sermon Acts 16:31 The King's Highway Opened And Cleared (0293)

The King's Highway Opened And Cleared

A Sermon (0293)
Delivered on Sabbath Morning, January 8th, 1860, by
the REV C H SPURGEON
at Exeter Hall, Strand.

And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy house. - Acts 16:31

You will remember that when the children of Israel were settled in Canaan, God ordained that they should set apart certain cities to be called the Cities of Refuge, that to these the man-slayer might flee for security. If he killed another unawares, and had no malice aforethought, he might flee at once to the City of Refuge; and if he could enter its gates before the avenger of blood should overtake him, he would be secure. We are told by the rabbis that once in the year, or oftener, the magistrates of the district were accustomed to survey the high roads which led to these cities. they carefully gathered up all the stones, and took the greatest possible precautions that there should be no stumbling-blocks in the way which might cause the poor fugitive to fall, or might by any means impede him in his hasty course. We hear, moreover, and we believe the tradition to be grounded in fact, that all along the road there were hand-posts with the word "Refuge" written... ..




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